Tuesday, 15 August 2017

God as King? I don't think so ....

To someone from a democrasy, in which the Queen is s figurehead living in a far-away country, the idea of God as King has always been a bit foreign.

This post from Rory Cooney, sharing the back story of one of his recent hymns has some interesting quotes, which got me thinking about it some more.
" the image of God we've inherited from monarchy and haven't shaken off, an image of God derived from power"

Since moving to Ireland, I've been struck by the extent to which monarchy is the model of church for so many people: bishops are princes, and the Pope is the king.   It just doesn't feel right though.   A king is just not something I need in my psyche.

Monday, 14 August 2017

Faith is sustained through the love of the person of Christ

Some quotes from:   http://www.catholicnewsagency.com/news/these-chicago-catholics-have-a-game-plan-for-evangelization-72415/

the Christian faith must contain a personal encounter with Christ because “the reality is, though, that people will find it difficult to die for a detached notion.”

Creating discipleship is more than an ethical problem – and Catholicism is more than “an intellectual system with a moral code attached to it.”


The faith can't be sustained solely as an idea, or even as the sacrifice required in the Christian life and as seen in martyrs and saints, he said. Rather, it's sustained through the love of the person of Christ.

On liturgical dance

Great quote on liturgical dance, from http://www.musicformass.blog/2017/05/30/what-came-first-rhythm-or-melody/
I’m not altogether convinced by the sort of liturgical dance I have seen, because it tends to be done at people rather than by people, and I think the point about liturgy is that we all do it together, especially the music.


Amen to that.  Liturgical dance is said to be praying with our bodies. But is it prayer for others who are just watching, not taking part. No matter how attentively they're watching, they're still present but not participating.   Their bodies are not engaged.

Sunday, 12 March 2017

You have to meet people at least half-way - not turn them off with your exquisite taste

Just found this piece from a pastor who understands why tasteful music cannot be used everywhere.   'Tis a few years after it was published, but still totally relevant.

Two great quotes:
So, whether it’s Kendrick or Byrd, Estelle White or Mozart; the important thing is that it is received. It is not my job to educate people in taste; I am supposed to educate them in sound doctrine, and I will be able to do so more efficiently in a context where they feel comfortable.
and

My people are wonderful people, and as far as I am concerned, the important thing is that they are here at Mass. Our church is full each Sunday, thanks be to God, and if the cost of that is dreadful music, then bring on the tambourines!

I'm going to make some use of these.

Thursday, 9 March 2017

Good mappings from scripture to readings

Sometimes indices which list hymns related to pieces of scripture take a very broad view of the link.  These ones are narrower - it's easier to see the link:

Gospel of John - http://catholic-resources.org/John/Liturgy-Music.html

Haugen songs from Mark, Luke and John:   http://catholic-resources.org/Bible/Music-Haugen.htm

Wednesday, 27 July 2016

Ad orientem and versus populum - which side of the altar does the priest stand on

A handy reference to both sides of the story, with not too many comments from haters of either stripe.

http://americamagazine.org/content/all-things/facing-east-during-liturgy-fact-and-fiction

Let's hope the whole thing has blown over before Advent rolls around.

Sunday, 3 July 2016

God as King? I don't think so ...

To someone from a democracy, in which the Queen is s figurehead living in a far-away country, the idea of God as King has always been a bit foreign.

This post from Rory Cooney, sharing the back story of one of his recent hymns has some interesting quotes:
" the image of God we've inherited from monarchy and haven't shaken off,an image of God derived from power"

Since moving to Ireland, I've been struck by the extent to which monarchy is the model of church for so many people: bishops are princes, and the Pope is the king.    Even though this is a republic, for many it's like the monarchy is still a deeply ingrained part of how the world works, which has to apply to both church and state.

Me, I'm not having a bar of it.